Tag Archives: pre-k to 2nd grade learners

Music Smart

In “Color Me Purple,” my book for children ages 8-12, the character Gommgi is music smart. She loves music and is recognized for the excellence of her piano performances. In this photo, I met a music smart child in the making. The research says that smart children often hum and sing early, have the ability to reproduce songs easily, show a strong desire to play an instrument, and display an emotional sensitivity to music. Little Maeve, while playing at her Grandma’s, broke into lullaby as she hugged and rocked her doll. She decided her lilting version of “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star” needed piano accompaniment, and after playing one chorus invited me to join her in a duet version. Yes, Maeve definitely is showing an early love and talent in music!

Wherever their curiosity and interest takes them, catch the moment!

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Coming Soon: Abuelita dice…

Yes, “Grandma Says…” is coming out in Spanish. “Abuelita dice que es bueno ser inteligente” will be available in about a week. More information to follow soon.

Jocelyn is back with more book reviews

Little Bird—Written by Germano Zullo; illustrated by Albertine, 2012. This book captivated me—at first with its illustrations and its silence—and then with its message.  Turn the pages! OK, a truck is driving along a road—what is so special about that? Keep turning the pages. Following an improbable and glorious flock of birds being released into the wide open sky, we read, “One could almost believe that one day is just like another.” This is a touching story, told mostly in pictures, of a man and a bird, and so much more than how they help each other fly. “There are no greater treasures than the little things.Just one is enough to change the world.” What a powerful message!

This gem of a book has spare illustrations and few words. It won the French equivalent of the coveted Caldecott prize for children’s picture book illustration. I have given this to special friends of the heart as well as graduates. What a wonderful, encouraging book! I recommend you share it with those you love.

Early reading is such a delight for this little boy and his grandma.

For more of Jocelyn’s reviews, go to the Tips and Previews page.

Week of the Young Child, 2012

April 22-28, 2012 is The Week of the Young Child, an annual celebration sponsored by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. The week is designated as a time to recognize that children’s opportunities are our responsibilities, and to ensure that every child experiences the type of early environment—at home, child care, school, and in the community—that will promote early learning. As my small contribution to The Week of the Young Child 2012, I am reintroducing children’s book reviews by Jocelyn from The Tattered Cover Book Store in Denver.

Every child of today should be fortunate enough to explore the ideas and perceptions of author Amy Krouse Rosenthal. Jocelyn has raved about Rosenthal’s books in her holiday reviews, still found on the “tips and previews” page of this blog. I also love Rosenthal’s books, but this newest 2012 publication holds a special place in my heart. Imagine that we could grow, harvest, and share kisses like we do flowers and vegetables. All my backbreaking work of spreading mulch in my yard last week would take on new meaning. And, believe me, I would be right up there in what I would expect to be a long line of interested consumers at our Madison Farmer’s Market this Saturday. Sharing this book is the next best thing to sharing the real thing.

Jocelyn’s review: Plant A Kiss by Amy Krouse Rosenthal. Illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds.

It never ceases to amaze me how a talented author and extraordinary artist can create a masterpiece whose sum is greater than its parts. With a few well-chosen rhymes and masterfully understated illustrations (including just a touch of sparkles), this book is the perfect example; how “little miss” planting a kiss ends up with “endless bliss” is a joy to behold the unfolding. I won’t be giving anything away by saying she dared to share. How thrilled I was when a friend shared this book with me! Enjoy!

More reviews on “Tips and Previews” page.

Macaulay, Schatz, and Other Children’s Book Authors

The title of this posting is misleading, I admit. I can hardly place myself in the company of David Macaulay. But, Jocelyn included Grandma Says It’s Good to Be Smart among the books she reviews this week − including Macaulay’s Black and White, and I am honored to be on the same page (so to speak) as Macaulay.

Macaulay’s first book was born just two years after my first son, and Alex grew up with Cathedral. Thus began his lifelong interest in architecture, construction, and all things beautiful, helped along by Macaulay’s soon-to-follow publication of Castle and City. Alex was hooked and, indeed, started his adult career in the fields of city planning and landscape architecture.

I had the distinct privilege of hearing David Macaulay speak in 2008 at the May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture. Arbuthnot’s classic work, Children and Books, had guided my choice of books in the classroom and at home, and to be there when Macaulay was honored in her name as a distinguished writer, educator, and children’s literature scholar was an opportunity I would never have expected. He talked of how ideas “rattle around in my brain,” and shared, “this life [as a creator, researcher, writer] is simply too much fun.”

That lecture was the stimulus for me to start my grandchildren on Macaulay. I bought The Way Things Work and Black and White. The former was a typical Macaulay book, packed with details, artfully designed, and comprehensively presented. The latter intrigued me. I had never seen a book quite like this one and had not seen or heard of it until that night. I finally gave it to my grandsons this year, thinking that at ages 6 and 8 they were ready to tackle the mysteries of the merging stories. They love it!

So thank you again, Jocelyn, for reviewing my book, reviewing Black and White, and tickling our curiosity with a plethora of new titles.

Read to Your Young Children Every Day

For the past month I have been posting the titles of exciting books for young children − mostly for preschool age, but also for children in grades K-2 who are still into picture books. In fact, I recommend picture books for all ages. They can be read by children and adults for not only enjoyment, but for conceptual development as well. Never underestimate the thought and discussion potential from reading simple statements and, moreover, from reading pictures.

Reading with Young Children

Unfortunately, the National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, reports that about 10 million children have difficulties learning to read. Even people with mild reading impairment do not read for fun and suffer from a low self-esteem. A surprising statistic is that reading problems affect girls at about the same rate as boys. Because boys are more apt to act out whereas girls more often enter a quiet dream world, boys receive more attention in schools for their reading difficulties. Long-term studies have shown that from 90 to 95 percent of reading-impaired children can overcome their difficulties if they receive appropriate treatment at early ages.

Parents can make the difference. Head Start research on the affects of reading to children under age 3 reports that English-speaking mothers who begin reading to their children as babies have toddlers with greater language comprehension, larger vocabularies, and higher cognitive scores by the age of 2. Likewise, Spanish-speaking mothers who read to their children every day have 3-year-olds with greater language and cognitive development than those whose children do not have the benefits of early reading. Researchers advise that parents take advantage of every book a child wants to read. Even out-dated books conceptually (for example science books) can connect with a child, convey basic information to build upon, inspire questions for further exploration, and simply provide parent-child bonding and fun.

Jocelyn of The Tattered Cover Book Store continues to recommend great new as well as some tried-and-true titles for the little ones. You will find these on the Tips and Previews page of this blog.

Grandma is Reading at Liliana’s

Every Sunday evening Liliana’s Restaurant in Fitchburg welcomes families, giving parents the opportunity to kick back, while their children (under age 12) eat free. This Sunday night there is an added bonus. I will be there, reading my book to children ages 0-7. If you live in the Madison, WI area or will be there for any reason on Sunday, Dec. 4, stop by anytime after 5 p.m. with your children.

 I look forward to meeting you, exploring ideas with your children, and signing books as well.

Start your child off reading like this little guy. A world of wonder is the result.

 

For more information on Liliana’s go to http://www.lilianasrestaurant.com/. And don’t forget – every Sunday is Family Night, and kids eat free.