Tag Archives: gifts for the holidays

Macaulay, Schatz, and Other Children’s Book Authors

The title of this posting is misleading, I admit. I can hardly place myself in the company of David Macaulay. But, Jocelyn included Grandma Says It’s Good to Be Smart among the books she reviews this week − including Macaulay’s Black and White, and I am honored to be on the same page (so to speak) as Macaulay.

Macaulay’s first book was born just two years after my first son, and Alex grew up with Cathedral. Thus began his lifelong interest in architecture, construction, and all things beautiful, helped along by Macaulay’s soon-to-follow publication of Castle and City. Alex was hooked and, indeed, started his adult career in the fields of city planning and landscape architecture.

I had the distinct privilege of hearing David Macaulay speak in 2008 at the May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture. Arbuthnot’s classic work, Children and Books, had guided my choice of books in the classroom and at home, and to be there when Macaulay was honored in her name as a distinguished writer, educator, and children’s literature scholar was an opportunity I would never have expected. He talked of how ideas “rattle around in my brain,” and shared, “this life [as a creator, researcher, writer] is simply too much fun.”

That lecture was the stimulus for me to start my grandchildren on Macaulay. I bought The Way Things Work and Black and White. The former was a typical Macaulay book, packed with details, artfully designed, and comprehensively presented. The latter intrigued me. I had never seen a book quite like this one and had not seen or heard of it until that night. I finally gave it to my grandsons this year, thinking that at ages 6 and 8 they were ready to tackle the mysteries of the merging stories. They love it!

So thank you again, Jocelyn, for reviewing my book, reviewing Black and White, and tickling our curiosity with a plethora of new titles.

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Book sale in progress

Orders for “Grandma Says It’s Good to Be Smart” are coming in at the post office box on the “Contact Ellie Books” page of this blog. Since Thanksgiving nearly 200 of the 300 copies have sold. Comments have been gratifying. Here’s one: “I wanted to let you know how much I love your book! It’s an absolute delight! You and the illustrator were clearly on the same wavelength.  I love the part where grandma says I can be anything I want…and I say I want to be a horse — and you turn the page to see the wonderful trio of horses. Fabulous. And it’s a thrill to see your name on the front cover.  Congratulations!”

Here’s another: “The book is wonderful and we can hardly wait to share it with our California grandson and put one on the shelf of our baby Madison grandson. But I need more to share with friends who have curious book-loving youngsters. Thank you for continuing to give to the world of young minds in your very special way. Our whole family is going to LOVE this book!”

Buy Smart; Buy Now!

Every child deserves the opportunity to grow up smart. This idea begins in the home. “Grandma Says It’s Good to Be Smart” is a book to help parents and grandparents reinforce this belief from birth to age 7.

I am hosting an Open House at my home on Sunday, Dec. 13 from 2-4 p.m. If you live in the Madison area and would like to buy a signed copy, stop by. For directions let me know of your interest via this site. I will also ship. See the instructions on the Ellie Books page.

See previous posts for more information on “Grandma Says It’s Good to Be Smart” and how it might fit your need for that special little child in your life.