Tag Archives: be smart

Opening Doors of Opportunity

If a child opens one door of opportunity, other opportunities that otherwise might not have existed will follow. This phenomenon is called “cumulative educational advantage.” It is about never holding a child back in his area of aptitude and interest. It means carefully planning special, supplemental educational experiences, starting early in school and continuing into college, graduate school, and professional life. It means studying deeply and broadly. Early experiences can include summer programs through private institutions and on college campuses; mentorships, apprenticeships, and internships; local, state, national, and international competitions; travel and study at special learning sites within our own country and abroad; distance learning and traditional correspondence courses; dual enrollment between two levels of school, such as high school and college, or early entrance to any level of schooling; and many more possibilities.

Such opportunities should never be viewed as “frosting on the educational cake,” according to the late Julian Stanley, renowned expert on educational acceleration. “Rather,” he writes, “they can be the most important ingredient… things that give you cumulative educational advantage are likely to be the best investments in your education your parents could possibly make” (1994, p. 4).

Harriet Zuckerman (1977) introduced the idea of educational advantage in her study of Nobel laureates in science. Scientists who studied at topnotch institutions and with past laureates had increased potential for becoming leaders in their field and even laureates themselves. She states (p.59-60), “Advantage in science, as in other occupational spheres, accumulates when certain individuals or groups repeatedly receive resources and rewards that enrich the recipients at an accelerated rate and conversely impoverish (relatively) the non recipients.”

Cumulative educational advantage is not about pushing, it is not as simple as graduating early, and it does not always involve being number one. It is about being in the right place at the right time, and usually it does not happen by coincidence. It happens when students are introduced purposefully to concepts, programs, activities, career possibilities, and people, who in turn introduce them to more and more possibilities until the right one clicks. It happens when their learning activities are accelerated in comparison with those of other students of equal ability and motivation. The effects may be multiplicative, because any one opportunity may open the doors to multiple other opportunities.

I just received a note from the mom of a past student of WCATY’s accelerated programs. He had lived and studied for three intensive weeks with the architects of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture as a high school junior . Here’s how cumulative educational advantage worked for this young man when his parents opened a summer door of opportunity:

“At the end of May, he graduated from Harvard University with a Masters in Architecture.  He was one of 14 out of 104 students who graduated with distinction.  At this time, he is temporarily working at his previous employer, Perkins + Will, in Chicago.  On August 1, he will begin employment at Adjaye Associates in Manhattan.  Chris is quite thrilled to be with such a creative and world-renowned firm.  He loves big city life (after coming from a town of 10,000!), and is looking forward to living and working in New York City.

“We are incredibly proud of Chris, and always tell people that the start of his confidence , determination, and drive came from his experience with WCATY at Taliesin.”

Parents often ask if the money for a special program or class will be well spent; they view it as a hardship (which often it is) instead of an investment (which may ultimately be of higher value). Yet through and since my years of experience in working with smart, motivated kids – matching them to opportunities that interest them – I have accumulated a wealth of stories like Chris’s. This IS the frosting on the cake of my career!

Please keep sharing your stories.

Another nice review

I have to share my joy in reading your book to my 3 year old granddaughter this weekend. She was interested and attentive to both the story and the illustrations.
It’s a wonderful, beautiful book.
Thanks so much for the personal message too!
Pat Neely

Is it good to be smart?

Obviously I think yes. That has been the premise of my work for decades as a teacher and non-profit executive, and is currently the premise of my children’s books, including the one I’m working on now with a multi-cultural focus. Is that what  you think?

The reason I ask is that I talked with a grandmother of a 3-year old this past week. She said of her grandson, “My daughter-in-law won’t let me tell him he’s smart. I naturally want to say, ‘_____ you’re so smart.’ She says, ‘Don’t say that. Say you are a good problem solver or I like the way you figured out how to…’

“So,” the grandmother asked, “you disagree with her?” My quick answer was yes, but it’s not that simple.

I think it’s a shame when children learn at home as well as at school that being smart is something to be ashamed of. Or, if it’s not shame, it’s taboo. We just don’t say we’re smart.

The point of my book for small children is to do exactly what this grandmother’s daughter-in-law was doing, but with one significant difference. When I say “exactly the same,” I mean the book defines what some of the characteristics of being smart are – reading, using a good vocabulary, problem-solving, imagining, being good to the world around us, etc. By a significant difference, I don’t think the daughter-in-law should make the word ‘smart’ taboo.

I used to do parent workshops on being gifted where at the beginning of a session, I would ask people to “stand up if you’re a good runner, a good pianist, a good cook,” etc. People would stand up with no hesitation to being good at different specific skills. Then I’d move on to “stand up if you’re creative, smart… gifted.” Usually people are comfortable with creative or smart, but rarely if ever are they comfortable with calling themselves gifted. This is the consequence not of anti-intellectualism but rather of a problem with comparing and labeling in our society. I choose to use the word smart in my books for young children because everyone should be proud to be smart. I’m troubled that this parent is not giving her child the freedom to understand that it is smart to be able to skillfully use all of his developing aptitudes in a positive way.

So, the bottom line? Grandma Ellie says it’s good to be smart. Grandma Ellie doesn’t limit her discussions of being smart to the skills in her book. Talking about using our cognitive as well as emotional and social abilities as we grow and learn and admitting there is a concept called “smart” can only help our children to understand themselves and others.

Young Learners

I dreamed of influencing new generations of motivated learners when I wrote “Grandma Says It’s Good to Be Smart.” At book signings as well as readings like those with my grandson’s preschool class, I realize that is beginning to happen. This little girl epitomizes what the book is about. She is joyous; she breathes enthusiasm for learning. When I first saw her, her eyes were sparkling with awe as she gazed at all the mechanical devices and aerial fantasies that decorate Ella’s Deli on East Washington Avenue in Madison. Her mother tells me she was excited to meet a real author AND to have me write her name and my name in her own book. This little girl, and my grandson and his friend as I read to them in Lafayette, Colorado two weeks ago, demonstrate the wonders of early learning. Their curiosity, motivation and  awe – for books, the outdoors, meeting people, and exploring the world – delight me.

Book review

“Grandma Says It’s Good to Be Smart” was reviewed in the April issue of Dane County Lifestyles in the Mixed Media section by Gary Knowles. Thanks Gary.

Go to: http://www.issuu.com/ogarapublishing/docs/lifestyles_april10

Reading to young children

I had the opportunity to spend a week with my youngest grandson. At the end of that week, he went back to preschool following his spring break and I read to his class before heading back home. This classroom and a few others now have my book for the children to enjoy at their leisure. Jordan is the little guy to my left in the photo. The children sitting on the letters on the other side of the rug (as directed by their teachers) are creeping in (as can be seen by the partial child to the right).

I’m thrilled that the book is reaching more and more children with the message that it is cool to be smart. This means that they enter the world of learning knowing that curiosity, exploration of ideas, reading, and thinking are all positive traits or skills for them to develop.

Book signing on April 14

I’m excited to have the opportunity to read and sign my books at one of the most popular sites that grandparents visit with their young grandchildren in Madison – Ella’s Deli. Please bring your young children or grandchildren to visit with me and get their personalized copy of the book between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m on the 14th.

Go to the following links for more information:

Book Signing with Ellie Schatz – Ella’s Deli and Ice Cream Parlor
Ellie Schatz Book Signing – April 14. Join us on Wednesday, April 14 for a book signing event with children’s author Ellie Schatz
www.ellas-deli.com/ellieschatz.php