Category Archives: Early Learning

Music Smart

In “Color Me Purple,” my book for children ages 8-12, the character Gommgi is music smart. She loves music and is recognized for the excellence of her piano performances. In this photo, I met a music smart child in the making. The research says that smart children often hum and sing early, have the ability to reproduce songs easily, show a strong desire to play an instrument, and display an emotional sensitivity to music. Little Maeve, while playing at her Grandma’s, broke into lullaby as she hugged and rocked her doll. She decided her lilting version of “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star” needed piano accompaniment, and after playing one chorus invited me to join her in a duet version. Yes, Maeve definitely is showing an early love and talent in music!

Wherever their curiosity and interest takes them, catch the moment!

Encouraging Curiosity Across Generations: Winning Post in the Color Me Purple Book Giveaway, by Corinda Rainey

Learning has always been and is very important in our household. We encourage our grandkids’ learning in a variety of ways. We think you have to tailor the learning to the child ‘s needs. That being said, we try to get books that help develop the kids’ interests and the work they are doing in school. For example, my grandson loves sports so we will finds sports books, magazines for him. My granddaughter loves science so we get books, games that speak to her interest in the science. We also connect them to people or events that can enhance their learnings. For example, they attended science camp, a two-week computer-coding class, Millionaire’s Club, and a variety of activities so they can have

Corinna Rainey

Corinda Rainey

exposure to different things, ideas, career options, etc. In addition, we encourage them by asking questions, doing research, and reading. We also have family game times where we play a variety of board games that not only teach them sportsmanship but how to play with others. In addition, they all have library cards and belong to a book club at Barnes and Noble. We make reading fun by having a healthy competition on the number of books read. We also encourage all of our grandchildren to learn something new each day even if it is a new word.

Image

Abuelita dice

IMG_1982

Children in a 2012-13 kindergarten immersion Spanish-language classroom received personal copies of Abuelita dice que es bueno ser inteligente for Christmas. At the end of the school year they wrote their own stories and shared them with me .IMG_1977

The teacher told me how one little boy had gained in confidence between December and May. Another little boy affirmed his teacher’s comment that he carried his copy of the book to and from school every day by taking it out of his backpack and showing me the sticker that marked it as his and his only!

What delightful outcomes. What charmingly smart children!

Abuelita dice… is in print

New from Ellie Books

When I was a child, we didn’t have the opportunity to learn a second language. We also didn’t have any children in my small-town school whose native language was anything other than English. I suffer today from a lack of confidence in tackling any language other than English as well as from a clear lack of ability to speak or comprehend any other language. Sad, but true.

I’m thrilled that my grandchildren are being introduced to Spanish at a young age. And, I’m thrilled that some elementary schools are offering immersion programs in Spanish.  I wish there were more such programs as well  a wider variety of children’s enrichment programs that introduce the languages our grandchildren will encounter in our world of global communications.

Abuelita dice que es bueno ser inteligente is for all the children of Spanish-speaking families. It is also for all the children learning Spanish in school or through a special private-language camp or program. The book is identical to the original book, Grandma Says It’s Good to Be Smart. 

Title page

I thank Joe Ketarkus for translating the story when I took a mocked-up version of the book to Peru in 2008, and working on the final translation for the published book this year. Thank you to Rosa Medina and Nuria Vega for reading and commenting on the Spanish-language version as native speakers. And thank you to my husband Paul for the patience and skill it took to change the words in the illustrations to their Spanish counterparts. That was a challenge I could not have accomplished without his steady hand and help.

Together, Joe, Rosa, Nuria, Paul and I are happy to be reinforcing the importance of reading, exploring, questioning, imagining, and being proud of one’s every new interest and accomplishment to many more children through the publication of this edition of the book. Enjoy.

Coming Soon: Abuelita dice…

Yes, “Grandma Says…” is coming out in Spanish. “Abuelita dice que es bueno ser inteligente” will be available in about a week. More information to follow soon.

Jocelyn is back with more book reviews

Little Bird—Written by Germano Zullo; illustrated by Albertine, 2012. This book captivated me—at first with its illustrations and its silence—and then with its message.  Turn the pages! OK, a truck is driving along a road—what is so special about that? Keep turning the pages. Following an improbable and glorious flock of birds being released into the wide open sky, we read, “One could almost believe that one day is just like another.” This is a touching story, told mostly in pictures, of a man and a bird, and so much more than how they help each other fly. “There are no greater treasures than the little things.Just one is enough to change the world.” What a powerful message!

This gem of a book has spare illustrations and few words. It won the French equivalent of the coveted Caldecott prize for children’s picture book illustration. I have given this to special friends of the heart as well as graduates. What a wonderful, encouraging book! I recommend you share it with those you love.

Early reading is such a delight for this little boy and his grandma.

For more of Jocelyn’s reviews, go to the Tips and Previews page.

Week of the Young Child, 2012

April 22-28, 2012 is The Week of the Young Child, an annual celebration sponsored by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. The week is designated as a time to recognize that children’s opportunities are our responsibilities, and to ensure that every child experiences the type of early environment—at home, child care, school, and in the community—that will promote early learning. As my small contribution to The Week of the Young Child 2012, I am reintroducing children’s book reviews by Jocelyn from The Tattered Cover Book Store in Denver.

Every child of today should be fortunate enough to explore the ideas and perceptions of author Amy Krouse Rosenthal. Jocelyn has raved about Rosenthal’s books in her holiday reviews, still found on the “tips and previews” page of this blog. I also love Rosenthal’s books, but this newest 2012 publication holds a special place in my heart. Imagine that we could grow, harvest, and share kisses like we do flowers and vegetables. All my backbreaking work of spreading mulch in my yard last week would take on new meaning. And, believe me, I would be right up there in what I would expect to be a long line of interested consumers at our Madison Farmer’s Market this Saturday. Sharing this book is the next best thing to sharing the real thing.

Jocelyn’s review: Plant A Kiss by Amy Krouse Rosenthal. Illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds.

It never ceases to amaze me how a talented author and extraordinary artist can create a masterpiece whose sum is greater than its parts. With a few well-chosen rhymes and masterfully understated illustrations (including just a touch of sparkles), this book is the perfect example; how “little miss” planting a kiss ends up with “endless bliss” is a joy to behold the unfolding. I won’t be giving anything away by saying she dared to share. How thrilled I was when a friend shared this book with me! Enjoy!

More reviews on “Tips and Previews” page.