Myths About Smart Children

When I looked at news and links from www.schoolinfosystem.org, I happened to click on an archived article that caught my eye. The headline: “They’re all rich, white kids and they’ll do just fine” — NOT!

Written in 2006 by two parent activists from the Madison Metropolitan School District, the article went on to say: “Two of the most popular — and most insidious — myths about academically gifted kids is that ‘they’re all rich, white kids’ and that, no matter what they experience in school, ‘they’ll do just fine.’ Even in our own district, however, the hard data do not support those assertions.” Their bottom-line question, after quoting statistics that clearly documented that high achievers at the start of their school career were dropping out of school disproportionately if they were poor or from minority populations, was: “Are we really prepared to sacrifice so many potential scholars and leaders of color?”

I find it appalling that the answer still seems to be “yes.” Why can’t our public school system ask of EVERY student, “How far can this student go?” Children of all ethnic and racial backgrounds, this is one thing that should be the same for all: the recognition that they are smart when they really are! Smart children cross all economic, cultural, and geographic boundaries. More than that, there are more poor children than there are rich children. So if we ignore the poor children when we consider talent development needs, we are losing LOTS of natural talent. These are children who might one day find – and, I’d like to think sooner rather than later – the cure for cancer, the key to peace in the world, the economic policy or health-care plan that will work for poorer and richer, conservative and liberal alike.

Poor children need someone to tell them they are smart. If their parents don’t know it, their teachers don’t see it, and the school systems deny those teachers the opportunities and tools to see all children for their strengths rather than their deficits, the chances are that many of them will end up among prison statistics as well as dropout numbers. Research suggests that the approximately 20% of the incarcerated could be classified as gifted – that’s a statistic AND an economic drain on our pocket books that we don’t want to hear.

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